The Precious Jewels

An organization striving to preserve the culture of Hip Hop thru research; presentations; lectures & aesthetics. Bookings for talks and lectures: preciousjewels777@gmail.com
(#TPJs @TPJJewels on twitter)
Let's Build.

Real men lets Build

I have this issue around manhood and being men that confronts me everywhere I look, everywhere I go. In many of the communities I usually go to, be it on a social visit, be it because I am there to stay for a short while, or whatever, and many communities that I have never been to, that I usually see on TV, one thing always strikes me. violence. People’s capacity for violence or aggression. it comes under many guises, violence in relation to drugs, violence in an effort to get respect or be feared, violence in order to gratify sexual desires as in the case of rape, the list goes on. Men are usually the perpetrators of this violence and when you look deeper into it, a lot of it makes sense through the lens of masculinity. It is all about being real men, what real men can tolerate and not tolerate, what they can do so forth.

It seems to me as if the capacity for violence really gives someone capital in society. and I don’t just mean physical violence but all sorts of violence. verbal violence for example as when you violate someone’s dignity through the things you say about them (because men say it like it is, don’t be a bitch about it say it like it is). I always think about how destructive these things are, yet how they serve very functional goals for a majority of people that engage in them. Some of us are helpless victims, or some of us can say to hell with it, I wont be treated like this, I wont tolerate this and then proceed to rectify the situation with more violence thereby perpetuation this cycle of violence. Because if we don’t, the hatred, the violence, and the lack of respect that it is accompanied by when it is directed at someone reduce us as people, we feel that we vanish into the background as men.

People love to be feared in order to induce respect. But why should we be feared? Why should we invoke (and emphasise) fear to command respect? Are we animals? Lions are feared, a damn bear, those are fierce. Fear often goes with very fierce methods for keeping it in place. It destroys.

Real men don’t destroy, they build, constructively. For me, the greatest men in history, who most command respect for me have been those who built and developed. Those who built pride and identity, thinkers like Malcom X, Steve Biko, Frantz Fanon, brothers who helped build nations with their ideas on humanity like Nelson Mandela, Dr Martin Luther King, Brothers who helped prolong people’s lives through medical operations like Dr Christiaan Barnard. The guy who invented the light bulb or the telephone, for me those were real men worthy of respect. Fear and violence have nothing to do with it.

So lets build, build with The Precious Jewels

Peace!

Eleyejah

@eleyejah

Mic Check Mic Check

Mic Check Mic Check

Fat B Dat G is for the people

Fat B Dat G is a South African underground rapper from Pietermaritzburg Kwa-Zulu Natal. He hails from a township called Sobantu in Pietermaritzburg. It is his experiences as young black male growing up in typical township conditions, on the outskirts of society, in the middle of violence and poverty that informs his rap. To understand the content found in what Fat B Dat G raps about is to delve into, to appreciate a reality that a majority of South Africa’s societies, and especially society’s young people go through on an everyday basis. To have been exposed to these things throughout his life has also been an eye opener for Fat B Dat G, and that is what he shares with his listeners in his music. To listen to his music is to be transported, to be taken on a journey that is at times unpleasant but insightful, grimy but heartfelt and passionate, callous but honest. His messages are uninhibited, speaking frankly and openly about social ills, an issue to which he addresses most of his works.

 Fat B Dat G’s music is also a comment on the state of rap music. He targets vitriolic attacks on corporate paragons of what is often considered ‘real hip hop’. He will not tolerate rappers who mislead the youth and he feels that an immense burden lays on ‘real emcees’ to provide direction in what is otherwise a field of confusion, misinformation, egocentricism and selfishness in rap music. Fat B Dat G maintains that this is a real burden in the hands of real rappers. And how can it not be? There is absolutely no representation of the real lives of millions of ordinary South African citizens in much of the rap media that we are confronted with on an everyday basis in our lives. The problems, the challenges, the everyday struggles of ordinary South Africans are not represented in rap music these days and those that are in the position to do so have not intention of doing so, they are distracted by issues that are somewhat on the periphery of the real issues. To listen to Fat B Dat G’s music is to garner an appreciation of the racial, cultural, social and political complexities of life.

Keep your ear out for Fat B Dat G’s latest offering Beast of Burden, out soon in 2014, release date still to be confirmed. The Precious Jewels will also be blessing you with an upload of a promo from this latest offering.

Peace!

Keep up with Fat B Dat G’s unique take on the state of rap and society on twitter:  @FatBDatG

In Search of Key X - - by: Khonza “Kami” Memela

In life we are ultimately governed by universal impulses. The impulses carry in them the character of cosmic bodies expressing themselves through us individually, traditionally, culturally, nationally and internationally. Over the past millenniums earthly scholars formulated these expressions into mystical systems of ciphers, within their core encoded the systematic expression of the universe on all levels, especially on the humanoid. Living things became symbols of certain energies that can be evoked and manipulated, hence manipulating the cosmic bodies and ultimately nations and individual.

How do we understand our outrageous emotions, or our impulsive reactions?

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Black History Month: Let’s Remember Whose Bones We Stand On —- by: Ras Jah X

“For Africa to me…is more than glamorous fact. It is a historical truth. No man can know where he is going unless he knows exactly how he arrived at his present place”. Dr. Maya Angelou.

“Is Black History Month still relevant”, the question that we should be asking is whether or not Black History is controlled by Black people? And if not, is it really Black History or a watered down, white washed version of our culture? Some people of always hold the idea that we are free now and Black History Month is not relevant, we have gained our freedom they will tell us there is no need for such memories. We as Black World of people have been lied to; we have been robbed and erased from the memory of the world. It is high times that we who love Black must stand firm and tell our stories during this month and beyond. Honorable Marcus Garvey the Black Tiger told us “A people Without The Knowledge Of Their Past History, Origin And Culture Is Like A Tree Without Roots”. Therefore it is important that we know our History for we will remember whose bones we standing by in this time.

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BLACK POWER
The Black Power Revolution
The Black Consciousness Movement
The Black Panther Party
Check Out the Wiki Links and do make sure you thru some more.
Peace and Love

BLACK POWER

The Black Power Revolution

The Black Consciousness Movement

The Black Panther Party

Check Out the Wiki Links and do make sure you thru some more.

Peace and Love

Two Must-Read articles above… Black History Month - 2014

Peace and Light to all… 

I firstly must acknowledge and apologize for our absence / inactivity here these past months, and also to those that have reached out to see if everything was fine and if TPJs is still moving, your queries and concerns are all acknowledged – much love and appreciation – We Are One – a Holy Integrated People,

As we nearing the end of this month - February - we look at the concept and idea of Black History Month, its relevance and significance in the modern era and the general discourse around this month - February. I noticed in an article I was reading that some even call it “Four Weeks of Black History. Well, whatever the case and whatever name one may personally feel is most suited for this month, the most important thing is that we still acknowledge Black History Month and that it is essential for a people to know their History (or as Ziggy Marley puts it - MyStory, not ‘His’tory). There’s no denying the fact that Africa is in the core of the World’s and Humankind’s history, but the irony is that the majority of Africans in the modern world are not even conscious of this fact, and certainly not conscious of this history. Infact, not many people know this history since the colonialism/slavery era to a large extent also consisted of the removing, fabricating, destroying, etc of African (Black) history, but that’s not where I wanted to divert your attention..

Now, instead of stressing my point further, I would like to invite you to read the two posts / articles by Ras Jah Xolani (he contributed in 2013 during Black History Month, see previous article) and Khonza “Kami” Memela (a brotha whose contribution and input within The Precious Jewels is long overdue). These are strong opinions taken by these Kings, and I’d like you to take your time reading it. 

Please do remember that you are Highly encouraged to Print out any articles you come across on this Blog, share them with 3 people and advice those 3 to also share with 3 other people.

Its totally up to us to educate each other and ourselves, we need to think about the Children we bringing up.

One Nation, One God, One Destiny.

PEACE

Lord Hakeem Kwezi. S 

"A scratch is nothing but the back-cueing that you hear in your ear before you push it out to the crowd. All you have to know is mathematically how many time to scratch it and when to let it go-when certain things will enhance the record you’re listening to. For instance, if you’re playing a record with drums-horns would sound nice to enhance it so you get a record with horns and slip it in at certain times-Homeboy"

South Africa: present day issues with perceptions of African traditions and people

Errors in terminology that keep us from progressing forward

image

In this piece I want to look at the way African traditional ways of life have been discredited and misunderstood in the imagination of foreigners and how this has affected the public’s imagination. I want to state that although there is freedom in South Africa, there is no equality, and this is especially so with White people. Traditional African ways of life still continue to be treated at the bottom rung of the social ladder. Key definitions that characterise African tradition and religion are still very problematic and incorrect if not offensive.

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Let’s Talk About The Mentality

… I started thinkin’, how many souls Hip Hop has affected? How many dead folks this art resurrected? How many nations this culture connected? Who am I to judge one’s perspective? ” – Common feat. Bilal – The 6th Sense

Peace, brothas and sistas…

I thought I’d start this off by quoting from on e my favourite hip-hop songs of all time. I’m sure we all know that song, but I want you to go back to it and listen carefully to Common’s rap there – in fact, I’ll give you the links for both the lyrics and to listen to the song.

 Now, I’ve got a question for you…and I also want you to ask yourself and those around you this very same question: 

What is YOUR role in the culture?

Just take a minute, think about this…. What is “having a role in the culture”?

I often meet people who believe that “loving” Hip Hop or being Hip Hop means that one has to rap, break, deejay, tag, make beats or any of the physical elements and extended elements associated with Hip Hop. What many don’t get is that Hiphop is a mentality, a state of being and also a train of thought AND, Hip Hop is our KULTURE. This implies that one doesn’t actually have to partake in the “physical elements” (lack of a better word) to BE Hip Hop or to LIVE Hip Hop.

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